Cooper Erving & Savage, LLP

The Employment Law Group of Cooper Erving & Savage

Protecting Civil Rights
for Over 25 Years

(518) 449-3900

Contact Us






Cooper Erving & Savage

Introduction to Firm's Employment Practice

From a civil rights perspective, aside from the Constitution itself, the most important law ever passed was the Civil Rights Act of 1871, which gave citizens the right to sue governmental officials who violate their constitutional rights. Our firm is one of the very few in the nation that can say it was in existence in 1871 when that law was passed.

We use that law, now known as 42 United States Code section 1983, and the many other civil rights, employment, and labor laws passed since that time, in fighting to get justice for our clients who have been victims of abuses of power either at the hands of governmental officials or private employers. We work hard for our clients and are dedicated to these very important and special cases, because this line of work is at the very heart of what makes the United States a democratic society and what can make us a more just society.

If you believe you have been mistreated and are seeking a remedy of this kind, we would be pleased to hear from you.

Employee Rights and Information Center

We offer a wealth of free workplace-related information in our Employee Rights and Information Center. Select a topic to continue:

CES Employee Rights Weekly Weekly

Topic of the Week

Can you be punished at work for your political beliefs? Maybe.

It may seem reasonable to assume that your employer can't fire you, demote you, or create some other negative consequence just because of your political beliefs. However, this may not be the case. The federal laws that protect us from discrimination based

Read more...

Blog of the Week

Trump economic adviser calls federal minimum wage a 'terrible idea'

Larry Kudlow, one of Donald Trump’s top economic advisers, took some time the week before Election Day to call the federal minimum wage a “terrible idea.”

Thought for the Week

"When it comes to the minimum wage, the biggest gap isn't between Republicans and Democrats; it's between politicians who don't want to raise the wage and the people they represent."

–Jonathan Schleifer, executive director of the Fairness Project on the successful minimum wage ballot measures in Missouri and Arkansas.

List of the Week

from NPR

 47% of eligible voters voted

Highest turnout for a midterm since 1966

Second highest turnout for a midterm since 1942

 

Top Five News Headlines

  1. House Democrats plan to push for $15 federal minimum wage
  2. Caring for Your Company’s Caregivers
  3. If an app is your boss, what, exactly, are you?
  4. Editorial: Too Many Workers Are Trapped By Non-Competes
  5. Benefits and bonuses aren't making up for slow wage growth

39 North Pearl Street, Fourth Floor, Albany, NY 12207 • Phone: (518) 449-3900 •
Contact us today »